Bad news

We arrived at the Fracture Clinic on Tuesday at 8.45 am in good time for my appointment at 9.30.

After the nurse took off the temporary plaster cast, I told the doctor examining me what I had told the doctor at casualty in the wee small hours of Saturday morning. I have this bad pain in my  calf (which by now, was far worse than it had been on Saturday).

He didn’t hesitate and referred me immediately to the, now what was it called, VNT clinic I think.  After some time waiting, then answering lots of questions, they sent me down for an ultra sound.

We had a long wait there, because of course, I had no appointment. While sitting there chatting to Mel, I suddenly felt faint, so I stuck my head between my legs (was sitting in a wheelchair). The kind receptionist noticed and called a nurse who came to see me and took my blood pressure which had plummeted…. Then there was another nurse, and I was wheeled around into Ultra sound, hoicked, a little ungainly, onto a trolley, head lower than my body and oxygen. Never had that before. Ooh, very exciting!

After a little while, my blood pressure came up and I felt better. What was that all about? I wondered. Perhaps the shock of it all.

Many thanks to the doctor who referred me to have an ultrasound as it showed that I had a blood clot in my calf, as I had glibly suggested to the A&E doctor three days earlier!

Then back to VNT dept., or whatever it was called, for bloods to be taken to check that I had normal  liver and kidney function, as I would need anticoagulants to disperse the clot and to stop another one forming in the next weeks of inactivity.

Then back to wait in the fractures’ clinic, for what seemed like ages. Finally, I saw the doctor who said that I wouldn’t be going back into a plaster, but would be fitted for a boot, which would allow me to put my heel to the floor. This would make life much easier.

Then back to the, what was it called, the VNT clinic to see a video, which I didn’t see (!), on DVTs and anticoagulants, and to be talked through the different medicines available and to be given a lovely, lovely, ham sandwich and ginger biscuits (which Mel ate). I had my first tablet too. Have to take two a day for 21 days and then one a day for 21 days. (Didn’t op for Wolferin or Heparin as they both involved injections!)

We left the hospital at 3.45 p.m after quite an adventurous day, having met many, lovely, kind nurses and doctors. Thank you NHS, I certainly have no complaints!

Losing the plaster and getting the ‘moon boot’ on Tuesday made life much easier. It’s bliss, so much easier, but I still haven’t ventured outside. Haven’t seen or touched Max, my horse, for a week. Am missing him terribly, but don’t want to put too much stress on parts of my body that are unaccustomed to it, too soon. Slowly, slowly I think is the best.

Another reason for not going outside, especially at the moment, as it is wet and slippery, is how do I clean the bottom of my moon boot? As I sleep in it, I don’t want, obviously,  to get my sheets dirty (nor my lovely ‘new’ sitting room carpet). The doctor did say that I could take my boot off, but didn’t say under what circumstances. As I live alone, I feel very vulnerable and don’t want to bash my ankle bone – on the outside – as that is where it’s fractured. Another thing on which to ponder…

Happily, each day the pain is less (thank goodness that pain in my calf has all but gone – does that mean that the clot has dispersed, I wonder?) and I am getting around easier. Yippee, no painkillers today. I always hate taking them as I feel that if you don’t feel the pain, you can overdo things.

I’ll solve it, slowly, slowly. There’s no rush, I’ve another five weeks at least, to take things easy. Bliss really all that time to relax!

“You’ll get so bored”, somebody said, but I don’t think so. So many books/newspapers to read; visitors to chat with; people to catch up with on Twitter; rug-making to get on with; house to keep clean (ha ha, I  never, normally, do housework); TV to watch; radio  to listen to; crosswords to do; Candy Crush to finish and hopefully, after a few weeks, haynets to fill and horse feeds to mix up. Then the dog needs a brush, de-fleaing, food to prepare, washing to do, etc. etc.

I really have to thank my neighbours who have happily taken little Alfie for walks with their dogs, collected the post and shut up the hens, and Nicky who has stoically taken over caring for Max, letting out and feeding the hens, de-dog-poop-ing the garden, taking my wheelie bin down to the end of the drive  and a zillion other things. Thanks too, to my dear friends, especially Myf, who have kept me supplied with chocolates, cakes, flowers, provisions and best wishes. Where would we be without them? Thanks everybody for all your kindness and help,’ tis much appreciated!

6 thoughts on “Bad news

  1. Thanks for the warnings…same age as you and decided I MUST get back to riding..had my two old horses put to sleep many years ago and only have a donkey and a small pony…just bought new paddock boots and riding tights. Starting with a friend who instructs and also certified in therapeutic riding (how appropriate!)…..not a novice, having done tons of hunting and hacking, jumping , Pony Club, but old bones and body…so I will start slowly and think of you and hope for the best! Not sure if I can do more than a half hour at first and still walk to the car!
    I somehow missed your post about you got hurt and the clot, but all caught up and wish you the very best and a speedy recovery. One of the reasons I never replaced the horses is because I would have to ride alone and don’t think it safe…barn I had boarded at is closed..owners retired. Please keep us updated!

    • Hello Lynda, many thanks for your comment and best wishes. So glad you’ve made the decision to start riding again, there’s nothing like it! I agree, I don’t like riding alone. Until a couple of years ago, my partner and I used to ride out together, sometimes up to three and a half hours. Just gently hacking around the country lanes it was wonderful. I really missed the company, two years ago when we split up, not just because riding alone you have nobody to chat to, but, as you say from the security point of view. Fortunately, six weeks ago when Max bucked me off in the field, there was somebody close at hand to call 999. I had my mobile on me so could have called somebody, but would have probably just slowly walked the two miles home. Would have been difficult because he had obviously trodden on his reins and they had both snapped off at the end of the rubber on the bit side. So there was only about 10″ of rein hanging from the bit rings which would have meant leading him would have been difficult. But it all worked out okay in the end with just a painful back and whiplash to my neck, which were better in a week or so. Then I break my ankle dismounting…. silly or what???!

Would be thrilled to receive a reply